Escaping reality for a deeper experience

May 14, 2014

Image source: Broadsheet Melbourne

We all know that the biggest trends in 21st century entertainment and the way it’s consumed are driven by technology, but there is a wider cultural force at work shaping the kind of entertainment and experience we seek in our leisure time.

The Escape Room

The Escape Room is the latest in challenging shared experiences to hit Melbourne, and if its popularity is anything to go by (it’s booked out until September), they are onto something here. Based on a concept originating in Budapest, participants solve a series of quirky and inventive puzzles to unlock the mysteries hidden in the room, eventually leading to their escape.

“The result is a really sophisticated experience. There's a huge variety of puzzles, ranging from manipulating sound or drawing on things, to finding patterns and opening combination locks. Some involve no touching at all, or two people working together. It's much more fun than any computer game, and not at all mentally taxing.”

The puzzles tap into multiple styles of thinking and problem solving, meaning that it requires genuine team effort and provides something for everyone in the group mentally, as well as an emotionally rewarding experience. More engaging than a video game and more challenging than a board game, Escape Rooms are becoming top attractions around the world for both tourists and locals alike. 

One of our Labsters, Carina, has been lucky enough to have an Escape Room experience in Malaysia and describes it this way…

“It’s really mentally stimulating, in a way that we normally are not on a daily basis. It required lateral thinking and team work, to solve the clues we knew were right in front of us. The experience was compounded by the fact that we were completely on edge - in a dark, unfamiliar place, looking over our shoulders at a countdown clock. It was an experience that pricked all our senses.”


Seeking more meaningful experiences

Just as we turn to super foods to make the most out of our meals, we are also looking to make the most out of our entertainment time by packing in more meaningful experiences.

We do things with an educational, deeper experiential or challenging element. We go on holidays and do a cooking class or immerse ourselves in the local language and history to forge a connection with local culture, or we seek experiences that are outside of the mainstream.

This speaks to some of the cultural forces we have uncovered at The Lab, in particular Über intensity; the desire to make every moment count. Driven by the pace of life today, our spare time becomes valuable, because how you spend it matters. 


Belinda